TEACHER ENRICHMENT INITIATIVES (TEI) - ABOUT US

Search TEKS

Advance Search

Standing Still activity

Standing Still Activity
from Mobility Unit

 

levers in the body

Levers in the Body

 

Evaluation Strategies

 

Project Evaluations

 
TEI-SPARKT 2010 Resources  
   
Evaluation 2003-2008:
Science Knowledge and Science Attitudes
Progess Reports: 2006 | 2005 | 2004
 
   
Evaluation 2000-2003:
Curriculum Dissemination Methods     
Progress Reports: 2002 | 2001
 
   
Evaluation 1997-2000: 
Student Drawings and Sentence Completions
Progress Report: 1998
 
 
 
   

 

 

Rubrics

 
   Rubrics Overview

Processing Out Grading Rubric

   Classroom Learner Rubrics

Scaled Scores Rubric

   Process Skill Rubrics

 
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEI-SPARKT 2010 Resources :

SALSI Summer Feedback Form - 2010

TEI SPARKT Teacher Obesity PRE Test 2010

TEI SPARKT Teacher Obesity POST Test 2010

top

 

Evaluation 2003-2008:
Science Knowledge and Science Attitudes

Science Knowledge: Pre/post science knowledge tests were collected in 2006-2008 to test the effectiveness of the curricular materials. 

 

Selected Pre-Post Test Results
Lesson Title Pre Test Post Test
Levers in the Body
go to Levers Unit
47%
83%
  N=95; p<.001; r2=.53
Sedentary Stan
go to Diabetes Unit
61%
78%
  N=56; p<.001; r2=.22

Note: middle school students

 

The following are more examples of pre/post test results.

Blood Unit - Inheritance of Blood Types More about this activity
Bone Unit - Lessons 2, 4, & 5 More about this activity
Bone Unit - OsCosts® Game More about this activity
Cardiovascular Unit - Inflamm-O-Wars Game More about this activity
Cardiovascular Unit - Dire Progress More about this activity
Diabetes Unit - Sedentary Stan More about this activity
Levers in Body Unit - Levers in the Body More about this activity
Population Demographics Unit - Entire Unit More about this activity
Pulmonary Unit - Pom Pom Shooter More about this activity
Pulmonary Unit - Slicin' & Dicin' More about this activity

 

Science Attitudes
At the beginning of the 2004-2005 school year we collected data from over 3,000 middle school students regarding attitudes toward science using six published scales. We are empirically re-evaluating the psychometric properties of these instruments including the Draw a Scientist Test (DAST), the Images of Science and Scientists Scale (ISSS), the Test of Science Related Attitudes (TOSRA), the Women in Science Scale (WiSS), the Scientific Attitude Inventory (SAI), and the Simpson Troost Attitude Questionnaire (STAQ).

 

Our preliminary analyses showed that factor structures did not match original authors’ claims. Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, two- and three-factor solutions were found for the WiSS, ISSS, and SAI instruments. Several items from these instruments that did not fit the factor structures were removed. These shortened instruments with improved psychometric properties should prove to be more feasible for researchers and administrators. Additionally, our comprehensive review found that the majority of instruments have not undergone rigorous psychometric measures but are still being used for program evaluation. Further, only a minimal theoretical basis or historical perspective is provided by researchers in defining “attitude” (particularly “science attitude”), and why or how attitudes should be measured. Read more under our Peer Reviewed Publications link.

top

 

Evaluation 2000-2003: 
Curriculum Dissemination Methods

A controlled trial evaluation was conducted with four schools to test the best dissemination method. Data showed that in-school support by study staff working with school teachers was necessary to disseminate and increase utilization of the Positively Aging® teaching materials. Having the materials available on a website alone and providing summer training was insufficient. Further, utilization of the teaching materials remained low, in spite of the in-school efforts.  Several barriers to successful implementation were identified including student turnover, teacher turnover, competing programs, state and district mandates, and standardized testing. Read more under our Peer Reviewed Publications link.

top

 

Evaluation 1997-2000: 
Student Drawings & Sentence Completions

A controlled trial evaluation was conducted with two schools. Qualitative methods included using children's drawings to capture changes in views on aging. The implementation school data showed an increase in positive views and a decrease in negative views while control school data remained constant. Data findings were statistically significant and demonstrated that the Positively Aging® materials can move children to a more positive view of aging. Read more under our Peer Reviewed Publications link.

 

You may download our coding sheet and instructions:

"Help the N.I.A." Drawing Activity (Read more about this activity.)
Student Handout Coding Sheet Coding Instructions
     
Sentence Completion Activity (Read more about this activity.)
Teacher Handout Coding Sheet Coding Instructions

 

 

top

 

Teacher & Student Opinions
One way to qualitatively evaluate the curriculum and program is to ask the opinions of teachers and students.

Example Quote: "With this program, any teacher can pick up a lesson and teach a health topic." - High School Special Education Teacher

Read more quotes from teachers and students here.

 

Student Grade Cards
Another alternate for curriculum evaluation is for the students themselves to evaluate the curriculum! Explain to your students that they always receive grades for their work, now is their chance to grade the lesson. They can give the lesson/activity an A, B, C, D or F and explain why it deserves this grade. Teachers can collect the grade cards and analyze the comments for patterns or common themes.

 

You may download a sample student grade card here.

 

See what students thought of these activities:
Bone Unit - OsCosts® Game More about this activity
Cardiovascular Unit - Inflamm-O-Wars Game More about this activity
Diabetes Unit - Sedentary Stan More about this activity
Levers in Body Unit - Levers in Body More about this activity
Pulmonary Unit - Anatomy of Breathing More about this activity
Pulmonary Unit - Pom Pom Shooters More about this activity
Pulmonary Unit - Slicin' & Dicin' More about this activity
Pulmonary Unit - It's No Fun Being on Restriction More about this activity

 

top

 

 

Rubrics Overview

     To assist teachers with evaluating their students, rubrics are provided as examples of how to assess the quality of the work and processes by which the children are learning. The percentage grade applied to each rubric may vary with the skills being tested, the format for the activity (oral vs. written), and the time of year the questions and activities are used. The evaluation rubrics may be weighted to obtain a percentage grade by applying different scales - examples of scaled scores are also provided in this section.

     Introduction: Evaluating the effectiveness of the curricular materials and changes in the students' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs is central to accomplishing the objectives of the TEI lessons. In this lesson, we provide some examples of evaluation rubrics you may use in your classroom to assess your students. A rubric is a guideline with specified criteria for assessing the abilities and knowledge of your students. The rubrics are shared with the students before the activities so that they will understand how they are being tested and evaluated. The rubrics provided here are meant as suggestions. Teachers may adapt their own evaluation rubrics for assessing their students when using the TEI instructional material.

     To the Students: "The following are copies of some of the evaluation rubrics we will use with the TEI teaching material this year. A rubric is a system that allows you to know what is expected of you and how you are learning, improving, and progressing in class. Before each learning activity, you will be told which scaled rubric (score) we will use and what skills we will be evaluating. As your teacher, I believe you will appreciate this method of grading your skills. So often, you do many of these things well but are not given credit for them. Enjoy!"

Top

Classroom Learner Rubrics

Reflection: "Without help, write down the (concepts, exercises, or observations) we made together in class yesterday."

0 = None written
1 = Incorrect Information
2 = 1 correct item
3 = 2 or more correctly recalled items

Participation - Group Checklist : Does the Student:

Ask questions?
Make appropriate comments?
Take notes?
Complete tasks?

Participation - General:

0 = Does not participate
1 =

Participates inappropriately (specific rules for participation set prior to each activity)
2 = Participates appropriately for assigned task

Contributions to the Group Checklist : Does the student:

Ask questions for the group?
Keep the group on task?
Encourage others?


Group Skills and Participation:

0 = Interferes with group
1 =
Does not participate
2 = Participates some of the time
3 = Always participates

Group Skills and Cooperation: 

0 = Does not contribute to the group
1 =
Sometimes contributes
2 = Consistently contributes to the group

Top

Process Skill Rubrics

The most common process skills require that students be able to use a broad range of content knowledge to:

1. Identify problems
2. Formulate hypotheses
3. Design experiments
4. Make observations
5. Collect data
6. Organize data
7. Interpret data
8. Formulate conclusions
9. Classify and generalize
10. Make predictions
11. Report results

Examples for rubrics for some of these process skills include:

 

Understanding the Problem:

0 = Student fails to restate problem in own words
1 = Student restates problem but misinterprets
2 =

Student restates problem and demonstrates correct understanding

Designing the Experiment:

0 = No experimental design
1 = No comparison of variables
2 = Comparison made but lacking data collection
3 = Comparison made with sufficient data collection

Making Observations:

0 = No observations made
1 = Only 1 or 2 observations made
2 = 3 or more observations made
3 = 3 or more observations made with supporting data collection

Data Collecting and Reporting:

0 = Student fails to collect any data
1 = Student describes observations in a disjointed manner
2 = Student produces data tables without meaningful labels
3 =

Student produces data tables with meaningful labels, but inaccurate recording of data
4 =

Student produces data tables with meaningful labels and accurate recording of data

Drawing Conclusions:

0 = No conclusions made
1 = Conclusions made but not supported by data
2 =

Conclusions supported by data by student fails to present the evidence
3 =

Conclusions supported by the data and student provides evidence

Making Predictions:

0 = Student makes no predictions
1 = Student makes one prediction
2 = Student makes one prediction per observation
3 =

Student makes one prediction per observation and the prediction is accurate/correct

Top

Processing Out Grading Rubric

0 = No Response from student.
1 =

Student response does not answer question or parts to a question are not answered.
2 =

Student answers questions without supportive detail; student may or may not respond in complete sentences.
3 =

Student processed questions with some supportive detail; student may or may not respond in complete sentences.
4 =

Student processed questions thoughtfully with supportive detail but did not answer in complete sentences.
5 =


Student processed questions thoughtfully with supportive detail or justification and the responses were written in complete sentences.

Top

Scaled Scores Rubric

In addition to the rubrics noted above, scaled scores may be provided to weight the numerical values. These weights may then be used to provide traditional averages based on a 0-100 rating scale. Students should be aware of the scaling values assigned to the rubric numbers. Examples of different scaling schemes are provided.

Scaled Scores Rubrics
Rubric Score
Scale wt 1
Scale wt 2
Scale wt 3
Scale wt 4
0
0
0
0
0
1
60
60
60
60
2
80
75
80
75
3
100
85
90
90
4
 
100
100
95
5
 
 
 
100

Teachers are encouraged to develop and utilize their own scaling as their classroom needs evolve.

 

top